Spontaneous Ocular Findings and Esthesiometry / Tonometry Measurement in the Göttingen Minipig (Conventional and Microbiologically Defined)

  • Olivier Loget

Summary

Gross examinations, ocular reflexes, esthesiometry, indirect ophthalmoscopical and biomicroscopical examinations and tonometry were performed in eighteen 6 to 8 week old microbiologically defined and in fourty-nine 2 to 10 month old conventional Göttingen minipigs. Ophthalmological findings often consisted of embryonic remnants (hyaloid artery, pupillary membrane) which seemed to decrease in incidence with time, although this decrease was not confirmed by statistical analysis. The most important findings were either considered to be congenital in origin or of undetermined etiology. The most noteworthy findings were, in decreasing order of incidence, as follows : hyaloid artery remnants (microbiologically defined 83.3 %, conventional 76.5 %), tigroid fundus (microbiologically defined : 72.2 %, conventional : 75.5 %), slight lens opacities (microbiologically defined : 38.9 %, conventional : 41.8 %) and pupillary membrane remnants (microbiologically defined : 33.3 %, conventional : 21.4 %). These findings did not affect the visual capabilities of the pigs.

Keywords

Toxicity Chrome Europe Retina Fluorescein 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olivier Loget
    • 1
  1. 1.Pharmakon Europe Domaine des OncinsL’Arbresle CédexFrance

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