Characterization of the Human Endometrium in Relation to Implantation

  • Peter C. Svalander
  • Paul V. Holmes
  • Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson
  • Marja-Liisa Swahn
  • Matts Wikland
  • Marc Bygdeman
Part of the Reproductive Biology book series (RBIO)

Abstract

Endometrial receptivity for implantation is highly relevant in the clinical practice of in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET). By the advancement of assisted reproductive technology, it has become increasingly evident that human implantation is indeed a complex biological process, having many characteristics in common with an inflammatory reaction and a tumour invasion. Since medico-legal contraints limit the possibility of investigating and revealing the mechanisms of human implantation, most research is confined to studies of the separate tissues involved, i.e. the human blastocyst grown in vitro, the endometrium in situ, endometrial biopsy material, and culture of the separate cell types. Without reviewing the entire scientific literature on implantation in animals and man, we would like to present some fundamental views on human implantation with emphasis on studies of the mid-luteal phase endometrium of normal, fertile women. In a recent series of experiments, we obtained endometrial biopsies from the ovulation-timed cycles of normal women, both in control cycles and in treatment cycles, using the progesterone antagonist RU 486. Endometrial biopsies were obtained in the mid-luteal phase at the time corresponding to implantation and these were analysed by immunohistochemistry with a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The aim of these studies was to gather basic data that would aid in the manipulation of implantation to improve the success rate of human IVF-ET treatment.

Keywords

Permeability Acetone Estrogen Leukemia Assure 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter C. Svalander
    • 1
  • Paul V. Holmes
    • 1
  • Kristina Gemzell-Danielsson
    • 2
  • Marja-Liisa Swahn
    • 2
  • Matts Wikland
    • 1
  • Marc Bygdeman
    • 2
  1. 1.Fertility Center ScandinaviaCarlanderska HospitalGöteborgSweden
  2. 2.Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynec.Karolinska InstituteStockholmSweden

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