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Backarc Basins pp 407-420 | Cite as

Opening Tectonics of the Japan Sea

  • Kensaku Tamaki

Abstract

The examination of the crustal structure and ODP deep-sea drilling results introduced the following opening model of the Japan Sea. The opening of the Japan Sea was initiated by the extension and thinning of the proto-Japan island arc, which was situated on the margin of the Eurasian continent at ca. 30 Ma. During the extension process a large strike-slip fault was generated at the eastern margin of the proto-Japan Sea. The strike-slip movement cut through the entire lithosphere and caused it to split, triggering development of a seafloor spreading system at ca. 28 Ma. The seafloor spreading system propagated to the WSW direction into the thinned crustal zone and formed the eastern part of the Japan Basin that is presently underlain by oceanic crust. In the meantime, the southwestern part of the Japan Sea suffered continuing extension and thinning of the arc crust and formed basins and rises. The basins are composed of thinned lower arc crust overlain by volcanic layers, and the rises are composed of fragmented upper arc crusts. The propagation ceased at ca. 18 Ma, leaving the contrasting topography of the present northern and the southern Japan Sea. The extension and thinning of arc or continental crusts and subsequent development of a propagating spreading system, which is initiated at a basin margin strike-slip zone, are common and fundamental processes of most backarc basins.

Keywords

Oceanic Crust Backarc Basin Ocean Drill Program Seafloor Spreading Japan Basin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kensaku Tamaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Ocean Research InstituteUniversity of TokyoNakano-ku, Tokyo 164Japan

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