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Dietary Antioxidants and Breast Cancer Risk: Effect Modification by Family History

  • C. B. Ambrosone
  • S. Graham
  • J. R. Marshall
  • R. Hellmann
  • T. Nemoto
  • J. L. Freudenheim
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 366)

Abstract

Since breast cancer in a first-degree relative has been shown with some consistency to be associated with breast cancer risk (1), it is possible that family history modifies the effects of other risk factors, with disease in women with a family history possibly resulting from a different etiologic pathway. Studies have indicated that risk associated with some reproductive factors varies significantly for women with and without a family history (2). Since antioxidants have been shown to have an inverse association with breast cancer risk (3), these factors may also vary in their effects for women with and without a family history of the disease.

Keywords

Breast Cancer Family History Breast Cancer Risk Premenopausal Woman Reproductive Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    J.R. Harris, M.E. Lippman, U. Veronesi, et al., Breast cancer, N Engl J Med. 327:319–328 (1992).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    C. Byrne, L.A. Brinton, R.W. Haile, et al., Heterogeneity of the effect of family history on breast cancer risk, Epidemiology. 2: 276–284 (1991).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    D.J. Hunter, and W.C. Willett, Diet, body size, and breast cancer, Epidemiol Rev. 15:110–132 (1993).PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. B. Ambrosone
    • 1
  • S. Graham
    • 1
  • J. R. Marshall
    • 1
  • R. Hellmann
    • 1
  • T. Nemoto
    • 2
  • J. L. Freudenheim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Social and Preventive MedicineState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineState University of New York at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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