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Vascular and Cellular Protein Changes Precede Hippocampal Pyramidal Cell Loss Following Global Ischemia in the Rat

  • T. M. Wengenack
  • J. R. Slemmon
  • J. M. Ordy
  • W. P. Dunlap
  • P. D. Coleman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 366)

Abstract

Several recent studies have reported increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to large molecules such as immunoglobins and serum albumin following global ischemia.1 These studies have been qualitative, however, using immunohistochemical methods with descriptive results. Furthermore, no studies have assessed the BBB permeability of hemoglobin following global ischemia. This is especially relevant since hemoglobin has been reported to generate free radicals and be neurotoxic in vitro and in vivo.2 Free radicals, or reactive oxygen species, have been hypothesized to be a contributory factor in several neurodegenerative disorders, including ischemia.3

Keywords

Pyramidal Cell Global Ischemia Adenylate Kinase Peptide Fraction Outlier Test 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. M. Wengenack
    • 1
  • J. R. Slemmon
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. M. Ordy
    • 3
  • W. P. Dunlap
    • 4
  • P. D. Coleman
    • 1
  1. 1.Depts. of Neurobiol. & Anat.Univ. of Roch.RochesterUSA
  2. 2.Depts. of Biochem.Univ. of Roch.RochesterUSA
  3. 3.PittsfordUSA
  4. 4.Psychology Dept.Tulane Univ.New OrleansUSA

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