UK Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling System Validation Studies

  • D. J. Carruthers
  • C. A. McHugh
  • A. G. Robins
  • D. J. Thomson
  • B. Davies
  • M. Montgomery
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 18)

Abstract

The UK Atmospheric Dispersion Modelling System (UK-ADMS) is a new PC based dispersion model for continuous releases, or releases of finite duration, based on an up to date understanding of the boundary layer and dispersion and, including the complex effects of underlying complex terrain, buildings and coastlines. The scientific approach used has been described at previous ITM’s (Hunt et al 1990, Carruthers et al 1993). After extensive validation and testing the system has now been released. The purpose of this paper is to summarise the main features of the system and present important aspects of the validation.

Keywords

Convection Covariance Sedimentation Radionuclide Hunt 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Carruthers
    • 1
  • C. A. McHugh
    • 1
  • A. G. Robins
    • 2
  • D. J. Thomson
    • 3
  • B. Davies
    • 3
  • M. Montgomery
    • 3
  1. 1.Cambridge Environmental Research Consultants Ltd.CambridgeUK
  2. 2.University of Surrey, Surrey and National PowerSwindonUK
  3. 3.Meteorological OfficeBracknellUK

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