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The Influence of Aqueous Phase Chemistry on Long Term Ozone Concentrations over Europe

  • J. Matthijsen
  • P. J. H. Builtjes
  • M. G. M. Roemer
Part of the NATO · Challenges of Modern Society book series (NATS, volume 18)

Abstract

Clouds affect tropospheric ozone levels through aqueous phase chemical reactions and by altering radiation transfer and mixing. Cloud droplets can act as important sinks for ozone and ozone precursors such as oxidized hydrocarbons and NOΧ (NO+NO2) through aqueous oxidation and/or wet removal. Moreover the presence of liquid water separates soluble and insoluble species which again can effect the ozone formation. For instance NO, which is relatively insoluble will be separated in the presence of cloudwater from the relatively soluble HO2, reducing effectively the formation of ozone in the gasphase.

Keywords

Cloud Droplet Cloud Evaporation Cloud Effect Stratus Cloud Aqueous Phase Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Matthijsen
    • 1
  • P. J. H. Builtjes
    • 2
  • M. G. M. Roemer
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Environmental ChemistryTNO Institute of Environmental Sciences (IMW)DelftThe Netherlands
  2. 2.TNO-IMW and IMAU Institute for Marine and Atmospheric ResearchUniversity of UtrechtUtrechtThe Netherlands

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