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Applications in Steel Structures

  • Pavel Marek

Abstract

Deterministic concepts based on allowable stresses and on a single deterministic safety factor are being replaced in structural steel design specifications by semiprobabilistic concepts offering a better evalu­ation of random variables, such as material properties and loads, affecting the reliability of structures. The reliability assessment procedure, called the limit states method (or load and resistance factor design [LRFD]1), is based on the statistical evaluation of material properties, loading effects, and other struc­tural parameters. Because of the lack of information on the probability distributions of individual random variables and their interaction, the current applications of reliability methods in specifications are based on various simplifications and have a deterministic format expressed in terms of partial safety factors related to the loads (load factors) and the resistance of the structure (resistance factors).

Keywords

Steel Structure Steel Construction Ultimate Limit State Safety Index Canadian Standard Association 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pavel Marek

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