Macroeconomic and Fiscal Challenges During the EU Accession Prosess: An Overview

  • Marek Dąbrowski

Abstract

At the end of 1997 five transition countries — the Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Poland, and Slovenia — were invited to start negotiations on their accession to the EU. In December 1999 five other countries — Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania, Romania and Slovakia joined the first group.

Keywords

Depression Europe Transportation Income Argentina 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

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  • Marek Dąbrowski

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