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Mail Use by Firms

  • Marc De Rycke
  • Sarah Marcy
  • Jean-Pierre Florens
Part of the Topics in Regulatory Economics and Policy Series book series (TREP, volume 38)

Abstract

The evolution of postal services from public monopolies to competition requires a good knowledge of customers. Commercial customers of La Poste are classified into two groups: major accounts, which negotiate special tariffs with La Poste, and small firms with no personal links with La Poste. The major-account mailer’s demand can be analyzed by examining existing and historical contracts with these mailers, but the demand of small firms requires a special analysis. La Poste decided to follow small firms demand for mail during several years in a panel study. The first sample survey was realized in 1998, and the second will be completed this year. This exploratory study examines data from the 1998 survey.

Keywords

Price Elasticity Micro Model Weight Structure Cross Price Elasticity Wholesale Trade 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc De Rycke
    • 1
  • Sarah Marcy
    • 1
  • Jean-Pierre Florens
    • 2
  1. 1.La PosteFrance
  2. 2.IDEI and University of ToulouseFrance

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