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Regional Economic Convergence: Is European Regional Policy Worth Keeping?

  • Michele Boldrin
  • Fabio Canova
Part of the ZEI Studies in European Economics and Law book series (ZEIS, volume 4)

Abstract

Regional economic inequalities within the European Union are more than twice those in the United States when measured by the standard deviation of regional per capita income. We look at the evolution of a variety of indices of regional economic inequality in the European Union and show that inequality in per capita income, unemployment and labor productivity has not decreased during the last 17 years.

Keywords

Unemployment Rate Labor Productivity Total Factor Productivity Poor Region Common Agricultural Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michele Boldrin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fabio Canova
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Minnesota and CEPRLondonUK
  2. 2.Universitat Pompeu Fabra and CEPRLondonUK

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