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Scale, Awareness and Conscience: The Moral Terrain of Ecological Vulnerability

  • Robert H. Socolow

Abstract

Prosperity is stressing the environment. This interaction can be illuminated by separating out aggregate size (scale), available science (awareness), and the obligation to respond (conscience). Solutions require an evolving vision of the good life, a sustained commitment to open science, and both an active and a reverent management of the Earth.

Keywords

Fixed Nitrogen Nitrogen Cycle Ethical Content Industrial Ecology Imaginary World 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert H. Socolow

There are no affiliations available

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