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Trade, Uncertainty, and New Farm Programs

  • Luther Tweeten
Chapter
  • 131 Downloads
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 20)

Abstract

I have contended for some years that the principal economic problem facing commercial agriculture is instability (Tweeten, 1989). It threatens not only farmers’ financial viability but also consumers’ food security, given consumer desire for stable food availability in the face of intermittently unstable food production.

Keywords

World Trade Organization Trade Liberalization Conservation Reserve Program Loan Rate Buffer Stock 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luther Tweeten
    • 1
  1. 1.The Ohio State UniversityUSA

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