Central and Peripheral Chemoreflex Characteristics: Panic Disorder Patients VS. Healthy Volunteers

  • Lukasz Struzik
  • Martin Katzman
  • Nishka Vijay
  • Aimee Coonerty-Femiano
  • Safraaz Mahamed
  • James Duffin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 499)

Abstract

Panic disorder is a psychiatric condition characterised by spontaneous panic attacks. These are discrete episodes of intense anxiety that are perceived to be uncontrollable and are accompanied by unpleasant physical sensations such as palpitations, chest pain, dyspnea, choking, sweating, tremors, faintness and paraesthesia. Although successful treatments for the condition are available, its etiology remains elusive1. In 1993 Klein has suggested that panic disorder patients possess a “false suffocation alarm” that may be associated with a lowered threshold for carbon dioxide detection2. The theory attributes carbon dioxide hypersensitivity as a causal instigator for panic in these patients, with carbon dioxide as the physiological messenger for detecting potential suffocation. To date there has been no assessment of the respiratory suffocation sensors, namely the central and peripheral chemoreflexes, in response to rising carbon dioxide levels.

Keywords

Dioxide 

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References

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    J. Duffin, R. M. Mohan, P. Vasiliou, R. Stephenson, and S. Mahamed, A model of the chemoreflex control of breathing in humans: model parameters measurement. Respir. Physiol. 120 13–26 (2000).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lukasz Struzik
    • 1
    • 2
  • Martin Katzman
    • 2
    • 3
  • Nishka Vijay
    • 2
  • Aimee Coonerty-Femiano
    • 2
  • Safraaz Mahamed
    • 1
  • James Duffin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of TorontoToronto, OntarioCanada
  2. 2.Centre for Addiction and Mental HealthAnxiety Disorders ClinicToronto, OntarioCanada
  3. 3.University of Toronto, Faculty of MedicineToronto, OntarioCanada

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