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Central Amino Acid Neurotransmitters, Ventilatory Output and Metabolism During Acute Hypdxia in Anesthetized Rats

  • M. R. Dwinell
  • H. Kazemi
  • J. T. Lam
  • F. L. Powell
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 499)

Abstract

Acute hypoxia decreases VO2in small mammals.1The magnitude of the fall in V02is related to the age of the animal, the level of hypoxia and the degree of development at birth.1In addition to the fall in Vo2with exposure to acute hypoxia, ventilation changes by first increasing from peripheral chemoreceptor stimulation and then decreasing in a time-dependent manner. The mechanism of such “roll-off”, or hypoxic ventilatory decline (HVD), is not fully understood.2 Although the carotid bodies are required for the increase in ventilation during the hypoxic ventilatory response, they are not necessary for the decrease in metabolism that occurs with hypoxia.1We propose calling this the hypoxic metabolic response (HMR), by analogy to the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR).

Keywords

Carotid Body Acute Hypoxia Amino Acid Neurotransmitter Hypoxic Ventilatory Response Ventilatory Output 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. R. Dwinell
    • 1
  • H. Kazemi
    • 2
  • J. T. Lam
    • 3
  • F. L. Powell
    • 4
  1. 1.Dept. of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA
  2. 2.Dept. of MedicineMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Dept. of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA
  4. 4.Dept. of Medicine and White Mountain Research StationUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA

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