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Human Milk Oligosaccharides

A Novel Method Provides Insight into Human Genetics
  • R. Erney
  • M. Hilty
  • Larry Pickering
  • Guillermo Ruiz-Palacios
  • Pedro Prieto
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 501)

Abstract

Human milk is a unique reservoir of oligosaccharides. The presence of many of these oligosaccharides is determined genetically and is related to the Lewis blood group and secretor antigen status of each donor. A method to quantitate neutral human milk oligosaccharides was developed. Sample preparation was based on a single centrifugation-filtration step that yields oligosaccharide extracts. These extracts first were fractionated to remove a significant portion of their lactose content and were analyzed using high-pH anion-exchange chromatography. Oligosaccharide profiles from 386 milk samples obtained in this fashion generated quantitative information on lactose, the neutral cores lacto-N-tetraose (LNT) and lacto-N-neotetraose (LNneoT), and the key fucosylated oligosaccharides. Additionally, the profiles provided genetic footprints of the Lewis and secretor status of the donors. Furthermore, unusual profiles that could not have been predicted from known genotypes were found. For this reason, milk glycoproteins were studied using carbohydrate-binding

probes. Results confirm that oligosaccharides are an accurate predictor of the Lewis blood group status of the donor, and that glycosyltransferases have exquisite specificities. The data obtained in this study corroborate that Lewis-related antigens are tissue specific. This attribute of immunodominant carbohydrate sequences has significant implications for epidemiological studies of breast-fed infants.

Keywords

Milk Sample Human Milk Antigenic Determinant Secretor Status Lactose Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Erney
    • 1
  • M. Hilty
    • 1
  • Larry Pickering
    • 2
  • Guillermo Ruiz-Palacios
    • 3
  • Pedro Prieto
    • 1
  1. 1.Abbott LaboratoriesColumbus
  2. 2.Center for Pediatric ResearchEastern Virginia Medical School, Children’s Hospital of The King’s DaughtersNorfolk
  3. 3.Salvador Zubirán National Institute of NutritionMexicoMexico

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