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Anti-Infectious Properties of the Human Milk Fat Globule Membrane

  • H. Schroten
  • M. Bosch
  • R. Nobis-Bosch
  • H. Koehler
  • F.-G. Hanisch
  • R. Plogmann
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 501)

Abstract

Secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), the predominant antibody fraction of human milk, represents a major protective factor against neonatal infection. Until now, sIgA had been identified only in the humoral fraction of human milk For bovine milk an association between sIgA and the milk fat globule (MFG) membranes has been demonstrated. The aim of our study was to assess whether sIgA is associated with the MFG membranes in human milk. Using anti-sIgA-agglutinated human MFG and immune fluorescence microscopy, we demonstrated that sIgA is, in fact, associated with human MFG. Subsequently, by electrophoretic separation of human MFG membranes and Western blotting, we demonstrated specific sIgA bands, suggesting that sIgA is truly an integral part of the human MFG membrane. This may be of physiological relevance, as undigested and functional human MFG are found in the stools of the newborn.

Keywords

Human Milk Bovine Milk Secretory Immunoglobulin Integrin Binding Protein Major Protective Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Schroten
    • 1
  • M. Bosch
    • 1
  • R. Nobis-Bosch
    • 1
  • H. Koehler
    • 1
  • F.-G. Hanisch
    • 2
  • R. Plogmann
    • 1
  1. 1.University Children’s HospitalDüsseldorfGermany
  2. 2.University of CologneInstitute for Biochemistry IICologneGermany

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