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Parenteral Infusion of a Lactating Woman with Intralipid

Changes in Milk and Plasma Fatty Acids
  • Robert G. Jensen
  • Carol J. Lammi-Keefe
  • Maureen MacBurney
  • Vasuki Wijendran
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 501)

Abstract

A nursing woman afflicted with short bowel syndrome received parenteral infusions of Intralipid. In the morning following 2 nights of infusion, samples of milk and blood were taken; additional samples were taken the morning after 1 and 2 nights of no infusion. The fatty acid composition of these samples was determined by gas chromatography. The Intralipid infusion contained 51.5% linoleic acid (C18:2). The C18:2 content of the milk was highest (14%) after each infusion and dropped to about 10% on days 1 and 2. Inverse changes were seen in stearic acid (C18:0). The C18:2 content of the plasma showed little change, remaining at about 23%. These results provide further direct evidence that the composition of milk fatty acids can be influenced by changes in the composition of external sources of fatty acids to the lactating mother.

Keywords

Parenteral Nutrition Milk Sample Fatty Acid Profile Human Milk Short Bowel Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert G. Jensen
    • 1
  • Carol J. Lammi-Keefe
    • 1
  • Maureen MacBurney
    • 2
  • Vasuki Wijendran
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Nutritional SciencesUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Brigham and Women’s HospitalBostonUSA

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