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Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

Clinical Description and Diagnosis
  • Ernst Niedermeyer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 497)

Abstract

“Syndromes” are clusters ofclinicalsigns and symptoms, most commonly caused by various etiologies. In the diagnosis of the Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), however, the clinical semeiology is not sufficient. The clinical signs must be combined with typical EEG features. It is their integrated appearance that is the true basis for diagnosis of LGS.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy NREM Sleep Tonic Seizure Epileptic Syndrome Frontal Lobe Epilepsy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ernst Niedermeyer

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