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The Landau-Kleffner Syndrome

  • Hanna Kolski
  • Hiroshi Otsubo
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 497)

Abstract

Landau and Kleffner, in 1957, were the first to describe an idiopathic syndrome consisting of acquired aphasia, seizures and paroxysmal EEG abnormalities.72 Since their original description of “epileptic aphasia” in 6 children, over 200 cases of LandauKleffner Syndrome (LKS) have been reported5,37,86,89 with various clinical and neurophysiological features.31,121

Keywords

Status Epilepticus Language Disorder Clinical Seizure Epileptic Syndrome Convulsive Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hanna Kolski
    • 1
  • Hiroshi Otsubo
    • 1
  1. 1.NeurologyThe Hospital for Sick ChildrenTorontoCanada

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