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Plant Biomonitors in Aquatic Environments

Assessing Impairment Via Plant Performance
  • Lesley Lovett-Doust
  • Jon Lovett-Doust
Chapter
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 56)

Abstract

In this review we focus on use of the aquatic macrophyte, Vallisneria americana, as a biomonitor of overall environmental conditions in the Laurentian Great Lakes. An array of measures of plant performance have been investigated; estimates of the leaf-to-root surface area ratio have proved to be the most consistently effective and useful. The species has been used in many different ways to characterize plant response to single organochlorines and metals, PCB mixtures, and as a bioassay of sediment toxicity, in the lab and in the field, to evaluate designated Areas of Concern, and to focus upon individual microsites and point source impact zones.

Keywords

Aquatic Plant Aquatic Macrophyte Environmental Toxicology Root Surface Area Sediment Toxicity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lesley Lovett-Doust
    • 1
  • Jon Lovett-Doust
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of WindsorWindsorCanada

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