Children, Adolescents, and Families Exposed to Torture and Related Trauma

  • Robert S. Pynoos
  • J. David Kinzie
  • Malcolm Gordon
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

The child and adolescent population of South Africa will be the first generation to enter into adulthood in the postapartheid period. The academic achievement and economic productivity of these young people, as well as the stability they bring to marriage and family life, their views of their social institutions, and their role in society, are all vital to the future of this region. Thus, their recovery from the years of political violence and apartheid, together with their adaptive response to the challenges of the adverse social conditions of the postapartheid era, is essential for the well-being of South Africa. (Used with permission.)

Keywords

Corn Depression Shipping Cortisol Dexamethasone 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert S. Pynoos
    • 1
  • J. David Kinzie
    • 2
  • Malcolm Gordon
    • 3
  1. 1.UCLA Trauma Psychiatry Service, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of California at Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryOregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA
  3. 3.Neuroscience Center BuildingNational Institute of Mental HealthBethesdaUSA

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