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Sleep Disorders

  • Dennis A. Kelly
  • David B. Coppel
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

There has been a burgeoning interest in sleep medicine and sleep disorders during the past two decades. This is evidenced by the establishment of the National Sleep Foundation and the American Sleep Disorders Association. The increase in the number of accredited sleep laboratories and steady increment in research funding for sleep disorders also attest to the growth of this field.

Keywords

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Sleep Apnea Sleep Disorder Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome NREM Sleep 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis A. Kelly
    • 1
  • David B. Coppel
    • 2
  1. 1.Neuropsychology ServiceMadigan Army Medical CenterTacomaUSA
  2. 2.Providence Medical CenterSeattleUSA

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