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Irradiation of Dog Brain with Single Doses of X-Rays

  • J. Benczik
  • M. Tenhunen
  • J. Hopewell
  • M. Snellman
  • M. Kallio
  • L. Kankaanranta
  • H. Joensuu

Abstract

It is not possible to selectively irradiate a single hemisphere of the dog brain with epithermal neutrons. Therefore, a whole brain irradiation study with photons was carried out to establish adequate controls for the normal tissue tolerance studies with boron neutron capture irradiation at the Finnish Research Reactor.1 The primary objective of the study was to obtain a radiation-induced dose effect curve for visible changes on computerised tomography after photon irradiation and to calculate the ED50 to this change. Computerised tomography (CT), with contrast enhancement, was used to detect the changes in the brain, induced by radiation, after 20 months follow up. A secondary objective of the present study was to estimate possible differences in response between half brain and whole brain irradiation. The results of whole brain irradiation in dogs in the present study were compared to those obtained by Fike using half brain irradiation.2,3 For immobilisation of the dogs during high-energy photon irradiation an anaesthetic agent that does not suppress the arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) is needed. In this study we used general anaesthesia accomplished with intravenous (iv.) propofol as the induction agent and isoflu-rane as the maintenance agent to ensure the oxygen saturation of haemoglobin.

Keywords

Pulse Oximeter Brain Irradiation Epithermal Neutron Photon Irradiation Iodinate Contrast Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    J. Benczik, T. Seppälä, J. Hopewell, M. Snellman, et al., Large animal model for healthy tissue tolerance study in BNCT, in “Frontiers in Neutron Capture Therapy,” M.F. Hawthorne, K. Shelly, R.W. Wiersema, eds., Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, 2001, pp. 1233–1238.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    J.R. Fike, C.E. Cann, R.L. Davis, et al., Computed tomography analysis of the canine brain: effects of hemibrain X irradiation, Radiat Res., 99:294–310, 1984.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    J.R. Fike, C.E. Cann, K. Turowski, et al., Radiation dose response of normal brain, Int J Radiat Oncol, l4(l):63–70, 1988.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Benczik
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Tenhunen
    • 3
  • J. Hopewell
    • 4
  • M. Snellman
    • 1
  • M. Kallio
    • 5
  • L. Kankaanranta
    • 3
  • H. Joensuu
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Diagnostic ImagingUniversity of HelsinkiFinland
  2. 2.Clinical Research InstituteHelsinki University Central HospitalHelsinkiFinland
  3. 3.Department of OncologyHelsinki University Central HospitalHelsinkiFinland
  4. 4.The Churchill, HospitalHelsinki Finland Research Institute (University of Oxford)OxfordUK
  5. 5.Department of NeurologyHelsinki University Central HospitalHelsinkiFinland

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