Teaching Across Cultures

  • John B. Biggs
Part of the Plenum Series on Human Exceptionality book series (SSHE)

Abstract

Teaching across cultures, whether as an expatriate teaching in a different culture, or as a local teaching international students, is an experience that many university teachers see as problematic. The following comment from the United Kingdom on teaching international students is typical:

many overseas students now originate in Pacific Rim countries, whose educational cultures characteristically value a highly deferential approach to teachers and place considerable emphasis on rote learning. This approach, of course, promotes surface or reproductive learning, which is at variance . . . with officially encouraged teaching innovations . . . to ensure deep transformational learning (Harris, 1997: 78).

Keywords

Arena Alba OECD Rote Smite 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • John B. Biggs
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of Hong KongHong Kong

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