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Gastrointestinal Phenotype of Aquaporin Knockout Mice

  • Tonghui Ma
  • Alan S. Verkman

Abstract

Fluid transport is a major function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In humans, more than 9 litres/day of fluid are absorbed or secreted across epithelia and endothelia in salivary gland, stomach, the hepatobiliary tract, pancreas, small intestine and colon (Figure 1). There is increasing evidence that aquaporin water channels (AQPs) are involved in GI fluid transport and digestive function. At least seven aquaporins are expressed in various epithelia and endothelia in the GI system. There are functional data that some GI cell types expressing aquaporins have high or regulated water permeability. Phenotypic analysis of transgenic knockout mice lacking various aquaporins has provided direct evidence that aquaporins are involved in saliva secretion, dietary fat processing, and colon fluid transport. This brief chapter summarizes recent progress on the GI phenotype of aquaporin knockout mice.

Keywords

Null Mouse Gastric Acid Secretion Fluid Transport Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Saliva Secretion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tonghui Ma
    • 1
  • Alan S. Verkman
    • 1
  1. 1.Cardiovascular Research InstituteUniversity of CaliforniaSanFranciscoUSA

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