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  • Don E. Dumond

Abstract

relative time period: Follows the Western Arctic Small Tool tradition, although probably coexistent with final aspects of it; precedes the Thule tradition, although contemporary for some centuries with early regional aspects of it. Some investigators working in North Alaska incorporate this tradition in an expanded Western Arctic Small Tool tradition

Keywords

Beach Ridge Faunal Remains Alaska Peninsula Seward Peninsula Sociopolitical Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don E. Dumond
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of OregonEugeneUSA

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