The Changing World of Chinese Enterprise: An Institutional Perspective

  • W. Richard Scott

Abstract

Recent developments in institutional theory are reviewed in order to provide a conceptual framework within which to locate and consider studies of changes in Chinese enterprise. Institutional theory emphasizes the role played by regulative, normative, and cultural-cognitive processes in shaping social behavior and social structure. Changes in Chinese organizations are described and evaluated at three levels: societal, organizational field (state-owned enterprises), and individual organizations. Western models of organizing are introduced via numerous mechanisms, but must be adapted to fit the distinctive institutional characteristics of China.

Keywords

Europe Cage Income Expense Posit 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Richard Scott
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford UniversityUSA

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