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In vivo imaging of free radicals: Applications from mouse to man

  • Guanglong He
  • Alexandre Samouilov
  • Periannan Kuppusamy
  • Jay L. Zweier
Chapter
  • 401 Downloads
Part of the Developments in Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry book series (DMCB, volume 37)

Abstract

Free radicals and other paramagnetic species, play an important role in cellular injury and pathophysiology. EPR spectroscopy and imaging has emerged as an important tool for non-invasivein vivomeasurement and spatial mapping of free radicals in biological tissues. Extensive applications have been performed in small animals such as mice and recently applications in humans have been performed. Spatial EPR imaging enables 3D mapping of the distribution of a given free radical while spectral-spatial EPR imaging enables mapping of the spectral information at each spatial position, and, from the observed line width, the localized tissue oxygenation can be determined. A variety of spatial, and spectral-spatial EPR imaging applications have been performed. These techniques, along with the use of biocompatible paramagnetic probes including particulate suspensions and soluble nitroxide radicals, enable spatial imaging of the redox state and oxygenation in a variety of biomedical applications. With spectral-spatial EPR imaging, oxygenation was mapped within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of living mice, enabling measurement of the oxygen gradient from the proximal to the distal GI tract. Using spatial EPR imaging, the distribution and metabolism of nitroxide radicals within the major organs of the body of living mice was visualized and anatomically co-registered by proton MRI enablingin vivomapping of the redox state and radical clearance. EPR imaging techniques have also been applied to non-invasively measure the distribution and metabolism of topically applied nitroxide redox probes in humans, providing information regarding the penetration of the label through the skin and measurement of its redox clearance. Thus, EPR spectroscopy and imaging has provided important information in a variety of applications ranging from small animal models of disease to topical measurement of redox state in humans. (Mol Cell Biochem 234/235: 359-367, 2002)

Key words

free radicals EPR spectroscopy EPR imaging redox state redox metabolism oximetry co-imaging human skin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guanglong He
    • 1
  • Alexandre Samouilov
    • 1
  • Periannan Kuppusamy
    • 1
  • Jay L. Zweier
    • 1
  1. 1.The EPR Center and Division of CardiologyDepartment of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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