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Reflecting on Our Journey Through HRD in the E-Workplace

  • Catherine M. Sleezer
  • Linda K. Lawson
  • Roger L. Cude
  • Tim L. Wentling
Part of the Operations Research/Computer Science Interfaces Series book series (ORCS, volume 17)

Abstract

We used the metaphor of safari to describe our journey to discover how individuals, teams, and organizations integrate information technology applications in the e-workplace. We invited experts from various disciplines to join us on the journey, expecting that cross-disciplinary collaboration would help us discover cutting-edge thinking and practice. As it turned out, we underestimated the insights we would gain by roaming the e-workplace terrain in the company of these experts.

Keywords

Intellectual Capital Human Resource Development Human Performance Technology Centralize Data System Human Competence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine M. Sleezer
    • 1
  • Linda K. Lawson
    • 2
  • Roger L. Cude
    • 3
  • Tim L. Wentling
    • 4
  1. 1.Oklahoma State UniversityUSA
  2. 2.Williams CompaniesUSA
  3. 3.McLeod USAUSA
  4. 4.University of IllinoisUSA

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