The Three-Variable Model: From Occam’s Razor to the Black Box

  • Stephen G. Harkins

Abstract

In Chapter 5, I noted that there are five research traditions that suggest that the potential for evaluation affects task performance (social loafing, goal setting, social facilitation, intrinsic motivation/creativity, and achievement goal theory), and that, for the most part, these traditions do not take into account the findings obtained within the other traditions, nor the processes hypothesized to produce these findings. I then made a first attempt at an integration, suggesting that the performance findings from each of these traditions could be encompassed by taking into account only three variables: whether or not there is the potential for evaluation by an external source; whether the participants are asked to do their best or to strive to achieve a stringent goal; and whether the task is simple or complex.

Keywords

Fatigue Triad Boulder Lost Stake 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen G. Harkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Northeastern UniversityUSA

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