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Examining the Usefulness of DSM-IV

  • Richard H. Dana
Part of the International and Cultural Psychology Series book series (ICUP)

Abstract

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV (DSM-IV) (Psychiatric Association, 1994American Psychiatric Association, 1994) is an evolutionary product of a remedicalization of psychiatry that began in the 1970s to reintegrate psychiatry with medicine (Dana & May, 1986). DSM-IV provides the possibility for a reduction of the cultural bias present in earlier DSM versions by recognizing cultural diversity and improving the cultural boundaries for psychological disorders (Malgady, 2000). Nonetheless, this psychiatric awareness has resulted in a DSM vessel that is half-full or half-empty depending on an observer’s perspective of the fairness and credibility of DSM diagnostic standards for multicultural populations in the United States.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Psychiatric Diagnosis Panic Disorder Cultural Competence Cultural Axis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • Richard H. Dana

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