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Isolation and Characterization of Human Goblet Cells in Vitro: Regulation of Proliferation and Activation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase by EGF and Carbachol

  • Marie A. Shatos
  • Harumi Kano
  • Peter Rubin
  • Gabriel Garza
  • Darlene A. Dartt
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 506)

Abstract

The epithelium of the conjunctiva is a non-keratinizing stratified squamous epithelium1 Goblet cells, highly specialized epithelial cells, are located in the apical surface of the conjunctiva between the layers of stratified epithelium.2 These cells are primarily responsible for the secretion of the inner mucous layer of the tear film, thereby providing a physical and chemical barrier that hydrates the conjunctiva and protects it from exposure to other injurious agents. Abnormal mucin secretion (either overproduction or underproduction) by goblet cells can eventually lead to deterioration of the ocular surface.

Keywords

Salivary Gland Submandibular Gland Lacrimal Gland Norepinephrine Release Exocrine Gland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie A. Shatos
    • 1
  • Harumi Kano
    • 1
  • Peter Rubin
    • 2
  • Gabriel Garza
    • 2
  • Darlene A. Dartt
    • 1
  1. 1.Schepens Eye Research Institute and Department of OphthalmologyHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Massachusetts Eye and Ear InfirmaryBostonUSA

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