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Mucins and Ocular Surface Disease

  • Sawako H. Hibino
  • Hitoshi Watanabe
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 506)

Abstract

The ocular surface epithelium is covered by the tear film that consists of three layers: the lipid, aqueous, and mucus layers. The mucus layer is composed primarily of mucin proteins secreted by goblet cells. In addition to goblet cells of the ocular surface epithelium, the corneal and conjunctival epithelia also produces mucin.

Keywords

Lacrimal Gland Foreign Body Sensation Ocular Surface Damage Ocular Dryness Melbourne Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sawako H. Hibino
    • 1
  • Hitoshi Watanabe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyOsaka University Medical SchoolOsakaJapan

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