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Effects of Ageing on Changes in Morphology of the Rat Lacrimal Gland

  • Ernest Adeghate
  • Claire E. Draper
  • Jaipaul Singh
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 506)

Abstract

Keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS) or dry eye syndrome occurs with increasing age,1 and recent studies have shown that ageing can have marked consequences on lacrimal gland function. Ageing has been associated with a decrease in the ability of the lacrimal gland to secrete protein, peroxidase2 and hence the tear film. In order to understand the morphological changes associated with ageing, a detailed light and electron microscopical examination was performed on the lacrimal glands of different age groups of rats. This study was performed with the aim of understanding the role of ageing on the pathological alterations of the lacrimal gland, which appear to culminate in decreased aqueous tear secretion, a factor in the aetiology of KCS.

Keywords

Peritoneal Exudate Cell Immune Privilege CD95L Expression Immune Deviation Corneal Allograft 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ernest Adeghate
    • 1
  • Claire E. Draper
    • 2
  • Jaipaul Singh
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine and Health SciencesUnited Arab Emirates UniversityAl AinUnited Arab Emirates
  2. 2.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of Central LancashirePrestonUnited Kingdom

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