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Premotoneuronal and Direct Corticomotoneuronal Control in the Cat and Macaque Monkey

  • Bror Alstermark
  • Tadashi Isa
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 508)

Abstract

The literature on premotoneuronal and direct corticomotoneuronal (CM) control in the cat and macaque monkey is reviewed. The available experimental findings are not in accordance with a recently proposed hypothesis that direct CM connections have “replaced” the premotoneuronal pathways. Instead, we propose that premotoneuronal CM control plays an important role in motor control also in primates and that the direct CM connection has been added during phylogeny.

Keywords

Macaque Monkey Experimental Brain Research Lateral Reticular Nucleus Corticospinal Neurone Corticospinal Projection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bror Alstermark
    • 1
  • Tadashi Isa
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept of Integrative Medical Biology, Section of PhysiologyUniversity of UmeåUmeåSweden
  2. 2.Dept of Integrative PhysiolNational Institute for Physiological Sciences, MyodaijiOkazakiJapan

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