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The Social Organization of Women’s Sexuality

  • Edward O. Laumann
  • Jenna Mahay
Part of the Issues in Women’s Health book series (WOHI)

Abstract

Women’s sexual behavior, while typically thought of as a matter of personal and individual choice, is fundamentally organized by social factors. This chapter examines how selected social factors, including religious preference, racial or ethnic group membership, and educational attainment, as well as age and marital status, shape women’s sexual desires, sexual partnerships, sexual acts, and subjective understanding of these facets of sexual experiences. While fully acknowledging the significance of biological factors in sexuality, we shall stress in this chapter the role social groups and contexts play in shaping women’s sexual conduct through their impact on the production and enforcement of socially constructed and shared conceptions of appropriate sexual behavior.

Keywords

Sexual Experience Sexual Satisfaction Sexual Event Sexual Script Vaginal Intercourse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward O. Laumann
    • 1
  • Jenna Mahay
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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