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Heterogeneity of Major Urinary Proteins in House Mice: Population and Sex Differences

  • Caroline E. Payne
  • Nick Malone
  • Rick Humphries
  • Carl Bradbrook
  • Christina Veggerby
  • Robert J. Beynon
  • Jane L. Hurst

Abstract

House mice (Mus domesticus) and rats (Rattus norvegicus) secrete large quantities of protein into their urine as the normal condition (Finlayson and Baumann, 1958). These proteins are major urinary proteins (MUP) and alpha2u-globulins respectively. Both are small proteins that have been assigned to the lipocalin protein family on the basis of sequence data (reviewed by Flower, 1996) and X-ray crystallography (Bocskei et al., 1992). As such, both display a typical lipocalin beta-barrel structure enclosing an internal cavity in which volatile ligands may bind.

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex House Mouse Laboratory Mouse Scent Mark Wild Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caroline E. Payne
    • 1
  • Nick Malone
    • 1
  • Rick Humphries
    • 1
  • Carl Bradbrook
    • 1
  • Christina Veggerby
    • 2
  • Robert J. Beynon
    • 2
  • Jane L. Hurst
    • 1
  1. 1.Animal Behaviour Group, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceUniversity of LiverpoolNestonUK
  2. 2.Protein Function Group, Faculty of Veterinary ScienceUniversity of LiverpoolNestonUK

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