Chemical Communication in the Pig

  • Dietrich Loebel
  • Andrea Scaloni
  • Sara Paolini
  • Silvana Marchese
  • Carlo Fini
  • Lino Ferrara
  • Heinz Breer
  • Paolo Pelosi

Abstract

Chemical communication in mammals often utilises soluble binding proteins, both to deliver the specific volatile pheromones in the environment and to detect them (Pelosi, 1994, 1996). These proteins belong to the large family of lipocalins, polypeptides of 150-200 residues, sharing a compact three-dimensional structure and a carrier function for hydrophobic ligands in aqueous biological fluids (Flower, 1995).

Keywords

Hydrolysis Cysteine Polypeptide Peri Odour 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dietrich Loebel
    • 1
  • Andrea Scaloni
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sara Paolini
    • 4
  • Silvana Marchese
    • 5
  • Carlo Fini
    • 4
  • Lino Ferrara
    • 3
  • Heinz Breer
    • 1
  • Paolo Pelosi
    • 5
  1. 1.Institut für PhysiologieUniversity of HohenheimStuttgartGermany
  2. 2.Centro Internazionale Servizi di Spettrometria di MassaNational Research CouncilNapoliItaly
  3. 3.IABBAMNatl. Research CouncilNapoliItaly
  4. 4.Dipartimento di Medicina Interna e Sezione INFMUniversity of PerugiaPerugiaItaly
  5. 5.Dipartimento di Chimica e Biotecnologie AgrarieUniversity of PisaPisaItaly

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