Multiple Perspectives on the Development of Adult Intelligence

  • Cynthia A. Berg
  • Robert J. Sternberg
Part of the The Springer Series in Adult Development and Aging book series (SSAD)

Abstract

In this chapter we explore the development of adult intelligence from four different perspectives: the psychometric, cognitive, neo-Piagetian, and contextual. These four perspectives were chosen to review the literature on adult intelligence because they offer a fairly diverse representation of guiding theories to adult intelligence that are dominant in the field at the present time (see Sternberg & Berg, 1992, for a review). Other perspectives on intelligence (e.g., comparative, biological, artificial intelligence) have not had the same presence in the field of adult intelligence as have these four perspectives.

Keywords

Income Posit Hunt Oates 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia A. Berg
    • 1
  • Robert J. Sternberg
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyThe University of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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