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Intranasal Delivery of Bioactive Peptides or Peptide Analogues Enhances Spatial Memory and Protects Against Cholinergic Deficits

  • Illana Gozes
  • Eliezer Giladi
  • Albert Pinhasov
  • Sharon Furman
  • Jacob Romano
  • Ruth A. Steingart
  • Sara Rubinraut
  • Mati Fridkin

Abstract

Studies utilizing the 28 amino acid vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), or glial-derived VIP-associated proteins as templates for future drug design originated from two lines of experimental results: 1] The findings of increased expression of the VIP gene (Bodner et al.,1985) during synapse formation (Gozes et al., 1987) and its decreased synthesis with aging (Gozes et al.,1988). 2] The findings of neuroprotective activities for VIP against electrical blockade (Brenneman and Eiden, 1986) that are mediated by glial cells (Brenneman et al.,1987; Brenneman et al.,1990) expressing high affinity VIP receptors (Gozes et al.,1991).

Keywords

Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Bioactive Peptide Peptide Analogue Benzalkonium Chloride Intranasal Delivery 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Illana Gozes
    • 1
  • Eliezer Giladi
    • 1
  • Albert Pinhasov
    • 1
  • Sharon Furman
    • 1
  • Jacob Romano
    • 1
  • Ruth A. Steingart
    • 1
  • Sara Rubinraut
    • 2
  • Mati Fridkin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Organic ChemistryWeizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael

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