Advertisement

Expression and Modulation of Blood-brain Monocarboxylate Transporters

  • Lester R. Drewes
  • David Z. Gerhart
  • Richard L. Leino
  • Bradley E. Enerson

Abstract

Neural activity and its high metabolic energy demands are sustained by the metabolic fuels and nutrients provided by the circulation. Recently, the molecular identity and primary structure of membrane carriers for monocarboxylic acids, a group of key metabolites in the central nervous system, were discovered. We have investigated these transporters in brain using protein and transcript specific probes to detect their expression and localization. These findings are now extended to the human brain and its cerebral vasculature.

Keywords

Ketone Body Brain Endothelial Cell Monocarboxylic Acid Cerebral Vasculature Monocarboxylate Transporter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Froberg, M. K., Gerhart, D. Z., Enerson, B. E., Manivel, C., Guzman-Paz, M., Seacotte, N., and Drewes, L. R., 2001, Expression of monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT2 in normal and neoplastic human CNS tissues. Neuroreport 12: 761–765.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Gerhart, D. Z., Enerson, B. E., Leino, R. L., Zhdankina, O., and Drewes, L. R., 1997, Expression of monocarboxylate transporter MCT1 by brain endothelium and glia in adult and suckling rats. Am. J. Phys. 273: E207–E213.Google Scholar
  3. Halestrap, A. P., 1999, The proton-linked monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) family: structure, function and regulation. Biochem. J. 343: 281–299.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Leino, R. L., Gerhart, D. Z., and Drewes, L. R., 1999, Monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1) abundance in brains of suckling and adult rats: a quantitative electron microscopic immunogold study. Brain Res. Dev. Brain Res. 113: 47–54.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Leino., R. L., Gerhart, D. Z, Duelli, R., Enerson, B. E., and Drewes, L. R., 2001, Dietinduced ketosis increases monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1) levels in rat brain. Neurochem. Inl 38: 519–527.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Price, N. T., Jackson, V. N., and Halestrap, A. P., 1998, Cloning and sequencing of four new mammalian monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) homologues confirms the existence of a transporter family with an ancient past. Biochem. J. 329: 321–328.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Yoon, H., and Philp, N. J., 1998, Genomic structure and developmental expression of the chicken monocarboxylate transporter MCT3 gene. Exp. Eye Res. 67: 417–424.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Yoon, H., Donoso, L. A., and Philp, N. J., 1999, Cloning of the human monocarboxylate transporter MCT3 gene: localization to chromosome 22ql2.3-ql32. Genomics 60: 366–370.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lester R. Drewes
    • 1
  • David Z. Gerhart
    • 1
  • Richard L. Leino
    • 2
  • Bradley E. Enerson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyUniversity of MinnesotaDuluthUSA
  2. 2.Department of Anatomy & Cell BiologyUniversity of MinnesotaDuluthUSA

Personalised recommendations