Determinants of Milk Sodium/Potassium Ratio and Viral Load Among HIV-Infected South African Women

  • Juana F. Willumsen
  • Anna Coutsoudis
  • Suzanne M. Filteau
  • Marie-Louise Newell
  • Andrew M. Tomkins
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 503)

Abstract

Although HIV can be transmitted from mother to infant through breastmilk,1 breastfeeding remains a key component of maternal and child health policy. Therefore, it is crucial to understand factors contributing to breastmilk HIV transmission, especially in Africa where HIV is most prevalent. In South Africa, exclusive breastfeeding was associated with a lower rate of transmission than was mixed breastfeeding with other foods.2

Keywords

Lactate Mastitis 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Juana F. Willumsen
    • 1
  • Anna Coutsoudis
    • 2
  • Suzanne M. Filteau
    • 1
  • Marie-Louise Newell
    • 1
  • Andrew M. Tomkins
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Child HealthLondonUK
  2. 2.University of NatalDurbanSouth Africa

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