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Central Mexico Postclassic

  • Deborah L. Nichols
  • Thomas H. Charlton

Abstract

absolute time period: 1300-429 b.p.-includes the Epiclassic (1300/1250-1050/1000 b.p.), Early Postclassic (1050/1000-800 b.p.), Middle Postclassic (800-600 b.p.), and Late Postclassic (600-429 b.p.). Absolute dates vary geographically.

Keywords

Craft Production Southern Central Northern Central American Antiquity Ceremonial Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deborah L. Nichols
    • 1
  • Thomas H. Charlton
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyDartmouth CollegeHanoverUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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