Late Southern California

  • John R. Johnson
  • Sarah Berry
Chapter

Abstract

Relative Time Period: Follows the Early Southern California tradition and precedes the historic period.

Keywords

Clay Shale Holocene Excavation Fishing 

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Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • John R. Johnson
    • 1
  • Sarah Berry
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologySanta Barbara Museum of Natural HistorySanta BarbaraUSA
  2. 2.Human Relations Area Files, Inc.New HavenUSA

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