Late Anasazi

Late Ancestral Pueblo
  • Michael Adler
Chapter

Abstract

Relative Time Period: Follows the Early Anasazi tradition and precedes the historic period.

Keywords

Burning Clay Maize Sandstone Shale 

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Suggested Readings

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References

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  2. Adler, Michael A, Todd Van Pool, and Robert D. Leonard (1996). “Ancestral Pueblo Population Aggregation and Abandonment in the North American Southwest.”Journal of World Prehistory 10, 3: 375–438.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Adler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologySouthern Methodist UniversityDallasUSA

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