Introduction — Problems of Multi-Level Democracies

  • Per Molander
Part of the ZEI Studies in European Economics and Law book series (ZEIS, volume 6)

Abstract

“Only a few years ago the inhabitants of Gothenburg were faced with just two ballot forms, one for the Riksdag (the national parliament) and one for the municipality,” Olof Petersson writes in his contribution to this book. “Today the people of Gothenburg are represented by politicians at six levels: the European Parliament, Västra Götaland (the county council), the Gothenburg region (indirectly elected), Gothenburg (the municipality), and the neighbourhood council (also indirectly elected)1. How will popular will be realised in what is far from a transparent system?”

Keywords

Migration Europe Assure Agglomeration Lost 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bergström, P., Dahlberg, M., Johansson, E. (1998) “The Effects of Grants and Wages on Municipal Labour Demand”, WP IFAU, Uppsala; under review for being published in Journal of Labour Economics.Google Scholar
  2. Boadway, R. (2001) “Inter-Governmental Fiscal Relations: The Facilitator of Fiscal Decentralization”, Journal of Constitutional Political Economy 12, 93–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brennan, G., Buchanan, J. (1980) The Power to Tax: Analytical Foundations of a Fiscal Constitution. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  4. Dahlberg, M., Fredriksson, P. (2001) Migration and Local Public Services. Working Paper, Nationalekonomiska institutionen, Uppsala Universitet.Google Scholar
  5. Davidsson, L. (forthcoming) Modeller för lokal självstyrelse. Normativa och empiriska lösningar på den vertikala maktdelningens problem. (Models for local autonomy. Normative and empirical solutions of the problem of vertical division of powers). To be published within the SNS Constitutional Project.Google Scholar
  6. Mulhall, S., Swift, A. (1992) Liberals and Communitarians. Sec. ed. (1996). Blackwell, Malden, Mass.Google Scholar
  7. Musgrave, R.A. (1959) The Theory of Public Finance. McGraw-Hill, New York.Google Scholar
  8. Nilsson, L. (red.) (2002) Flernivådemokrati i förändring (Multi-level democracy in a process of change). SOM-rapport 27, University of Göteborg.Google Scholar
  9. Oates, W.E. (1972) Fiscal Federalism. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York.Google Scholar
  10. Oates, W.E. (1999) “An Essay on Fiscal Federalism”, Journal of Economic Literature, vol. XXXVII (September 1999), 1120–1149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Oulasvirta, L. (1997) “Real and Perceived Effects of Changing the Grant System from Specific to General Grants”, Public Choice 91, 397–416.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Prud’homme, R. (ed.) (1991) Public Finance with Several Levels of Government. Foundation Journal of Public Finance, The Hague.Google Scholar
  13. Rubinfeld, D.L. (1987) “The Economics of the Local Public Sector”, chapter 11 in Handbook of Public Economics, vol. II (eds. Auerbach and Feldstein). Elsevier/North-Holland, New York.Google Scholar
  14. Stigler, G. (1957) “Tenable Range of Functions of Local Government”, in Federal Expenditure Policy for Economic Growth and Stability. Joint Economics Committee, Washington D.C.Google Scholar
  15. Stjernquist, N. (2000) Den kommunala självstyrelsen — i backspegeln och bortom nästa vägkrök. (Local autonomy — looking backwards and forwards) Svenska Kommunförbundet, Stockholm.Google Scholar
  16. Ter-Minassian, T., Craig, J. (1997) “Control of Subnational Government Borrowing”, i Ter-Minassian, T. (ed.), Fiscal Federalism in Theory and Practice. International Monetary Fund, Washington D.C.Google Scholar
  17. Tiebout, C. (1956) “A Pure Theory of Local Expenditure”, Journal of Political Economy 64, 416–424.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Molander
    • 1
  1. 1.MapsecStockholmSweden

Personalised recommendations