Impact Assessment as Viable Instrument for Poverty Reduction: Post-Hoc Review on Societal Impacts of Two Power Generation Projects

  • Mikiyasu Nakayama
  • Ryo Fujikura
Chapter
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 25)

Abstract

Economic development projects should be instrumental for poverty alleviation of the project area as well as other regions. It, however, often happens that those in the project area become worse off after the project implementation. The authors have found that assessments made by usual impact assessment methodologies were often not accurate and people in the project sites consequently become worse off. It is in particular the case for those who are obliged to relocate due to the projects or who are living in the vicinity of the project sites. In a dam construction project, quite often, many people were obliged to relocate and re-establish their livelihood in a different community from what they used to belong to. In such cases, they should overcome many difficulties to settle in a new location and resume their daily life.

Keywords

Dust Income Expense Fishing Crest 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mikiyasu Nakayama
    • 1
  • Ryo Fujikura
    • 2
  1. 1.United Graduate School of Agricultural ScienceTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyJapan
  2. 2.Ritsumeikan UniversityJapan

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