Gender and Economic Benefits from Domestic Water Supply in Semi-Arid Areas: A Case Study in Banaskantha District, Gujarat, Western-India

  • Joep Verhagen
  • Mary Miller
  • Neeta Patel
  • Reema Nanavaty
Chapter
Part of the Natural Resource Management and Policy book series (NRMP, volume 25)

Abstract

Combining improved water-supply with micro-enterprise development has much potential to alleviate poverty in semi-ardi areas. This case study, implemented by the Self Employed Women’s Association (SEWA) in Banaskantha district (Gujarat, India), combines the revival of the piped water supply and traditional water sources with a micro-enterprise development program for female entrepreneurs.

Keywords

Transportation Income Marketing Cyclone Malaria 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joep Verhagen
  • Mary Miller
    • 1
  • Neeta Patel
    • 2
  • Reema Nanavaty
    • 2
  1. 1.SEWAColumbia UniversityNew York CityUSA
  2. 2.SEWAIndia

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