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Novel, Membrane-Intrinsic Receptors for Progesterone and Aldosterone

  • Ralf Lösel
  • Michael Christ
  • Christoph Eisen
  • Elisabeth Falkenstein
  • Martin Feuring
  • Christiane Meyer
  • Armin Schultz
  • Martin Wehling

Abstract

In 1972, binding of [3H] aldosterone to plasma membranes from rat kidney with Kd ~ 100 nM was reported [1]. In a similar system, solubilization of binding activity was performed, but no further identification had been achieved [2]. Apart from these studies in the classical mineralocorticoid target organ, Armanini et al. [3] reported specific high-affinity binding of [3H] aldosterone to mononuclear leukocytes. The dissociation constant Kd was 2.7 nM with a binding site density of 209 sites per cell. The order of binding affinities was aldosterone ≈ deoxycorticosterone ≈ corticosterone > hydrocortisone > dexamethasone, which differs from the selectivity profile of the classic nuclear mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Microsomal membranes from mononuclear leukocytes were subjected to photochemical crosslinking with the radioligand aldosterone-3-(0-carboxymethyl)-oximino-(2-[125I]iodohistamine) in the presence and absence of an excess of unlabeled aldosterone. After SDS electrophoresis, a prominent maximum was visible at ~50 kDa which could be displaced by aldosterone, but not Cortisol [4]. Later, plasma membrane preparations from porcine kidney were studied with regard to non-classical receptors.

Keywords

Mineralocorticoid Receptor Acrosome Reaction Sigma Receptor Mononuclear Leukocyte Porcine Liver 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralf Lösel
    • 1
  • Michael Christ
    • 1
  • Christoph Eisen
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Falkenstein
    • 1
  • Martin Feuring
    • 1
  • Christiane Meyer
    • 1
  • Armin Schultz
    • 1
  • Martin Wehling
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Clinical Medicine MannheimUniversity of HeidelbergGermany

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